Pacific Crossing

Hawaii Five ‘Oh’

Although the building was designed to be a palace, Kamehameha V realized that the Hawaiian government desperately needed a government building. At that time, the several buildings in Honolulu used by the government were very small and cramped, clearly inadequate for the growing Hawaiian government.

We spend the day walking around downtown Honolulu when I came across this building.

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Ok I didn’t just find it, I was looking for it, being a big fan of Hawaii Five 0 I just had to get a photo to send back to the family, I took the shot and checked in on Facebook, the funny thing was, Facebook checked me in at Hawai’i 5-0 Headquarters, of course it’s not really 5-0’s headquarters it’s Aliʻiōlani Hale.

Aliʻiōlani Hale located in downtown Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, currently used as the home of the Hawaiʻi State Supreme Court. It is the former seat of government of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi and the Republic of Hawaiʻi.

Located in the building’s courtyard is the famed gold-leaf statue of Kamehameha the Great.

The Aliʻiōlani Hale was designed by Australian Thomas Rowe in an Italian Renaissance Revival as the royal palace for King Kamehameha V. In the Hawaiian language, Aliʻiōlani Hale means “House of Heavenly Kings”. The name “Aliʻiōlani” was also one of the given names of Kamehameha V.

Although the building was designed to be a palace, Kamehameha V realized that the Hawaiian government desperately needed a government building. At that time, the several buildings in Honolulu used by the government were very small and cramped, clearly inadequate for the growing Hawaiian government. Thus, when Kamehameha V ordered construction of Aliʻiōlani Hale, he commissioned it as a government office building instead of a palace.

Kamehameha V laid the cornerstone for the building on February 19, 1872. He died before the building was completed, and it was dedicated in 1874 by one of his successors, King David Kalākaua. At the time, Hawaiian media criticized the building’s extravagant design, suggesting that the building be converted into a palace as originally designed.

Until 1893, the building held most of the executive departments of the Hawaiian government as well as the Hawaiian legislature and courts.

It was from Aliʻiōlani Hale in 1893 that the Committee of Safety, under the leadership of Lorrin A. Thurston, deposed Queen Liliʻuokalani by public proclamation.

After the establishment of the Hawaiian provisional government in 1893 and the Republic of Hawaiʻi in 1894, some of the offices in Aliʻiōlani Hale were moved to ʻPalace Iolani , including the Hawaiian legislature. As a result, Aliʻiolani Hale became primarily a judicial building.

1 comment on “Hawaii Five ‘Oh’

  1. Very cool building and love reading about the history of it.

    Like

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